Tagged: Balance Transfer

NTH :: SBI reduces home loan rates by up to 25 bps

By Saloni Shukla, Sangita Mehta | ET Bureau|Updated: May 08, 2017, 03.38 PM IST | Economic Times

NTH

MUMBAI: Country’s largest bank, State Bank of India has reduced home loan rates between 10 to 25 basis points, a move that will force other lenders to reduce rates. SBI has refrained from cutting its marginal cost of lending rate (MCLR) which stands at 8% for one year. SBI has the largest share on the home loan market.

The bank will now charge salaried borrowers 8.35% on home loans upto Rs 30 lakhs as against 8.60% For loan above Rs 30 lakhs bank will charge 8.50%, down by 10 bps. The bank will continue to charge 8.60% on loans above Rs 75 lakhs. The rate cut will help only the new borrowers since the existing borrowers are locked into one year fixed rate on interest as per the rule of arriving at lending rates.

The reduction in rates comes within a month of five associate banks merging with the parent bank. Recently SBI cut deposit rates sharply by 50 basis points across different maturities.

SBI has also said that an eligible home loan customer can also avail of an interest subsidy of Rs. 2.67 lacs under the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana scheme. SBI said that to supplement the affordable housing push, SBI has also come out with special offerings for construction finance to the builders for affordable housing projects. “This will give a dual push both for construction finance and also for home finance for affordable homes.”

Mr Rajnish Kumar, managing director, SBI said, “We have seen a steep hike in the home loan enquiries recently and reduction in rates will further help millions of home buyers fulfill their dream of owning a home. Individuals can apply for home Loans through multiple channels.”

Source: https://goo.gl/ReoG9P

NTH :: Now Transfer Your Home Loan To SBI At Zero Processing Fees

SBI, the country’s biggest lender is charging zero processing fee on home loan takeover till June 30, 2017.
NDTV Profit Team | Last Updated: May 07, 2017 07:45 (IST) | NDTV Profit

NTH

Do you have a Home Loan with any bank or housing finance company at higher interest? If yes, then it may be a good opportunity for you to transfer your existing home loan to State Bank of India, as the country’s biggest lender is charging zero processing fee on home loan takeover till June 30, 2017. Even you can get higher than the amount currently outstanding in your home loan from SBI if you match their eligibility criteria, the state-owned lender said in its website.

Here are the details you need to know:

Home Loan can be taken over from the following Institutions:
Scheduled Commercial Banks (SCBs),Private and Foreign Banks, Housing Finance Companies (HFCs) registered with National Housing Bank (NHB), Borrower’s employers if they are Central/State Governments or their undertakings or Public Sector Undertakings.

Criteria
The borrower should have serviced interest and/or installment of the existing loan regularly, as per the original terms of sanction.

The borrower should have valid documents evidencing the title to the house/flat.

Whether take over with sanction of Higher Loan Amount & extended Repayment Period is possible?
Yes. Based on the merits of the case and requirements/ eligibility of the borrower, the Bank may sanction an amount higher than the amount taken over from other bank/ financial institution for purposes of renovation/ extension/ furnishings. Similarly extended repayment period may be sanctioned provided that at all times the criteria regarding maximum permissible finance and security margin under the Bank’s scheme are not diluted.

What is the procedure for Take Over?
The borrower should address a letter to the bank/ financial institution from whom he has availed the loan asking them to deliver, immediately upon receipt of the loan amount, the title deeds and other securities, if any, direct to our lending branch;

The borrower should give to the branch a request letter for paying to his existing lending bank/financial institution the outstanding amount of his loan by debit to his loan account.

The borrower must give an advice of the actual outstandings (with up-to-date interest) in the loan account from the other bank/ financial institutions; the statement of Account for the entire period of loan or for the last 10/12 months where the loan has run for a longer period;

Confirmation letter from the financing Bank that they have created an equitable mortgage over the property.

Documents required for availing the loan:
Disbursal must be effected only subject to the above information being found satisfactory and completion of formalities as regards

Agreement to create Mortgage, Power of Attorney in the favor of the Bank authorizing the Bank to create equitable mortgage on the borrower’s behalf.

Interim security (Ex: Bank Deposit Receipts, LIC Policies, etc) and the security obtained in the interim period will be released after receipt of the title deeds then the other Bank and creation of a valid equitable mortgage subsequent to verification of the borrower’s title to the property.

Whether pre-payment penalty is funded?
Yes. Total loan quantum, will however, continue to be determined by eligibility criteria based on income, EMI/NMI ratio, LTV ratio etc. applicable to Home Loans scheme.

Whether takeover of Home Loan with Top up loan is permitted?
Yes

Source: https://goo.gl/F7sooH

ATM :: Still paying interest on home loan at old rates? Cut EMI by switching to MCLR-linked rate now

By Narendra Nathan, ET Bureau| Mar 20, 2017, 04.06 PM IST | Economic Times

ATM

Just like bank depositors, those borrowing from banks also need to be alert in order to protect themselves against unnecessary charges. Given below are the most common areas where banks tend to overcharge customers.

If you compare the interest costs of your friends and relatives on bank loans—housing, auto, personal loan, etc.—you will realise that they vary drastically. And these costs not only vary across banks, but across customers of the same bank—and not because of varying customer credit scores. Some banks have been offering loans at cheaper rates to new customers, while charging old customers a higher rate. “Banks continue to follow the discriminatory practice of offering differential rates for existing and new customers and this should stop,” says Ramganesh Iyer, Co-founder, Fisdom.

As the banking regulator, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) should stop this discriminatory practice, which it is partly responsible for creating. The RBI introduced the MCLR (marginal cost based lending rate) method, effective April 2016, to enable a faster transmission of rate cuts to bank customers, replacing the base rate method that was being used by banks to set their lending rates—earlier the base rate had replaced the less transparent prime lending rate (PLR). Now, borrowers who took loans 4-5 years back, and did not ask their bank to switch to the newer regime, are still linked to the PLR. Those who borrowed when the base rate became the benchmark are stuck with the base rate. Now, while banks are giving new loans at cheaper rates, based on MCLR, old customers are still paying higher rates.

“Since banks offer different rates, it is better to visit some common aggregator and understand the lowest rates available in the market. This will help you bargain better with your bank,” says Dipak Samanta, CEO, iServeFinancial.

To reduce your interest outgo, you need to shift your loan from base rate or PLR to MCLR. Shifting to MCLR now is a good move, say experts. “Though RBI’s stand is neutral now, rates may not go up from current levels. In fact, they may come down later—after an year,” says Balwant Jain, investment expert. Bear in mind though, in an upward moving interest rate regime, MCLR will move up faster than base rates, just like it falls faster in a reducing interest rate regime.

Still paying interest on home loan at old rates? Cut EMI by switching to MCLR-linked rate now

Loan reset charges
There are two types of loans: Fixed and floating rate. Floating rate loans are supposed to mirror the rise and fall in interest rates set by the RBI. But this rarely happens. While banks increase rates immediately, they are very slow in cutting them. The introduction of new benchmarks has also turned out to banks’ advantage. They charge customers for shifting from one benchmark to another— from PLR regime to base rate regime to MCLR regime now. The charges are levied to meet the expenses involved in drafting and registering new agreements—stamp duty, registration charges, etc. Though these expenses vary across states, ordinarily they won’t be more than 0.2% of the outstanding amount. However, some banks try to profit from this also by charging around 0.5%.

Should you go for a reset even if it involves a small charge? Yes. The amount you save will be significantly higher over the years. To illustrate, consider the case of a home loan borrower with Rs 50 lakh outstanding loan amount and a 15-year tenure. A 1% fall in interest— from 9.5% to 8.5%—will bring his EMI from down from Rs 52,200 to Rs 49,250, a reduction of Rs 2,950 per month. A total saving of Rs 5.31 lakh—significantly higher than the reset fee of Rs 25,000 even at the maximum rate of 0.5%. You may be able to get this reset cost down by negotiating with your bank. A threat of shifting to another bank often works. “Another way is to approach the branch manager. Based on the value of your relationship, they can reduce or even waive charges,” says Samanta. The ‘value of relationship’ here is crucial. If you have multiple relationships with the bank—savings bank account, credit card, other loans, investment, etc.—you have a valuable relationship and will receive a favourable treatment.

Source : https://goo.gl/FBRCpI

ATM :: Time to shop for best home loan deals

RADHIKA MERWIN | 20th Feb 2017 | The Hindu BusinessLine
With the RBI signalling the end of the money easing cycle, sharp fall in rates is unlikely

ATM

There has always been a lot of fanfare and expectation around the Reserve Bank of India’s monetary policy. Borrowers make a hard case for rate cuts. Depositors cringe every time rates head south. And banks are chided for being tardy in lowering lending rates.

The reaction to the recent policy was however more muted though, with the RBI keeping rates on hold. Also, after reducing policy rate by a whole 175 basis points since the beginning of January 2015, the RBI appears to have changed course, signalling the end of the rate cut cycle.

Here’s what borrowers — old and new — should do to ensure they get the best deal on home loans, before the tide turns.

Don’t wait

Are you waiting for rates to fall further before taking a home loan? Sorry to dash your hopes, but it may not be the best choice to play the waiting game .

Lending rates have already dropped by nearly one percentage point over the last one year,thanks to the new marginal cost of funds-based lending rate (MCLR) that the central bank introduced in April last year. This new lending rate structure has forced banks to lower rates at a faster pace.

Starting April 2016, lending rate on your floating rate home loan has been pegged against the MCLR which replaced the erstwhile base rate. As a borrower, you need not be bogged down by the complex difference between the two. Suffice to say that banks use the latest rates offered on deposits for MCLR computation, and hence the rates have fallen sharply in the past year, particularly post-demonetisation.

While the RBI has indicated a wee bit of a headroom to cut rates, don’t count on it and lose out on best deals. SBI, in January, shook up the home loan market by lowering its one-year MCLR (against which home loans are priced) from 8.9 per cent in December 2016 to 8 per cent in January 2017. Other banks too followed suit.

Bank of Baroda’s home loan at its one-year MCLR of 8.35 per cent seems the top draw for now. This home loan product is unique as it links the rate on your home loan to your credit score. If you have been settling your bills and loan payments on time, and have a credit score of 760 and above, then you are eligible to get home loans at this rate.

Other leading banks, for now, offer only one rate for all borrowers, irrespective of the credit score. Central Bank of India and Union Bank of India offer home loans at 8.5 per cent and 8.6 per cent respectively. Others such as SBI and Axis Bank price their home loans at 8.65 per cent.

Why now

Rates have fallen by one percentage point over the past year

Rate hikes cannot be ruled out in the medium term

Few banks offer waivers to switch to cheaper loans

Make the switch

While new borrowers have had a lot to cheer, old borrowers — who have taken loans against the erstwhile base rate prior to April 2016 — have not had much respite. While banks have been slashing MCLR, they have not lowered their base rate. SBI, for instance, after holding its base rate at 9.3 per cent from October 2015, has only recently reduced it marginally by 9.25 per cent. This is still far higher than the one-year MCLR at 8 per cent.

Hence, old borrowers still pay a far higher rate on their home loans. In case of SBI, few borrowers still pay 9.5 per cent interest (spread of 25 basis points over base rate).

Banks, however, allow borrowers to switch into the new MCLR regime at a cost. The switching charge is 0.5 per cent of the loan outstanding in most cases (minimum of ₹10,000). If you have an outstanding loan of ₹50 lakh with SBI, with a remaining tenure of 15 years, you could save over ₹4 lakh of interest over the entire tenure of loan.

But do take note of the switching options that each bank offers, before deciding to move. Remember that lower the loan outstanding and tenure, lower the benefit. Hence, it will make less sense to switch if you are at the fag end of your loan tenure.

If you are looking to switch from one bank to another, keep in mind that you have to foreclose your loan, and then approach a new bank for a fresh loan. Here, banks usually charge a processing fee, which ranges from 0.5 to 1 per cent of the loan. There could be an additional service charge too. But do look for waivers offered by banks.

Brace yourself

Whether you have a home loan under the erstwhile base rate or MCLR, time you braced yourself for possible rate hikes too. If inflation risks heighten, rate hikes could be in the offing over the next 18-24 months.

If the new MCLR structure has forced banks to lower rates at a faster pace during the rate cut cycle, it can no doubt pinch you quicker when rates move up. This is because lending rates may increase at a steeper pace under MCLR.

But this is all the more reason why you should move to MCLR now. The far cheaper rates currently offered under MCLR (compared to base rate) will help cushion the rise.

Also, borrowers may find some solace in the reset clauses under the MCLR structure. Unlike under the base rate system where a revision in base rate was immediately reflected in the lending rates of all loans benchmarked against it, under the MCLR-based pricing, lending rates are reset only at intervals corresponding to the tenure of the MCLR.

In case of home loans, since the loans are benchmarked against the one-year MCLR, lending rates will be reset every year.

(This article was published on February 20, 2017)

Source: https://goo.gl/pQkrni

ATM :: Is it the right time to transfer your home loan?

Adhil Shetty | Last Updated: February 15, 2017 | 13:23 IST | Business Today

ATM

Over the last two years, the Reserve Bank of India has steadily reduced lending rates. Any rise or fall in the RBI’s repo rate will have a direct impact on your home loan interest rate. Therefore, in the recent past, lenders have reduced their interest on home loan products in tandem with the lowering of repo rate. Additionally, several lenders took an axe to their own lending rates following the culmination of the 50-day demonetisation drive.

In an ideal scenario, existing loan owners should benefit from these rate cuts. But in the past, this wasn’t often the case, with repo rate cuts not being adequately transmitted to borrowers. Which is why the RBI mandated banks to switch to the MCLR regime from the base-rate regime.

Since April 1, 2016, all new loans are linked to the bank’s marginal cost of lending rate (MCLR). These loans are more responsive to rate cuts in the sense that the rates change automatically on specified intervals of time mentioned in a loan agreement.

The question now is this – if you have a home loan now, should you consider transferring to another loan with a lower interest rate?

What existing borrowers can do
If you borrowed before April 1, 2016, your loan would be linked to the base rate, which is known to be less responsive to rate cuts. Assuming that you’re paying over and above the prevalent interest rate (in the region of 8.6%), you may be tempted to move to a cheaper loan. But this decision should be arrived at after carefully calculating the benefits of the transfer.

Lower interest rates are not the only reason why you should transfer your loan. You also have to look at the quantum of long-term savings as well as loan transfer costs.

Here’s a look at how you can weigh your transfer benefits.

The transfer costs: Transferring to another loan with your current lender may not involve costs. However, transferring to another lender will cost you some money. You have to pay processing fee on the balance of the loan transferred, administrative expenses, pre-payment penalty if you had a fixed rate loan, legal charges, stamp duty, etc. The aggregate of these costs lower the savings you make on the transfer.

The Remaining Tenure: If your loan is nearing its end, a transfer may not make sense. You may save costs on EMIs, your loan transfer costs may outweigh any savings.

The Long-Term Savings: This the gross of what you will save over the remaining term of your loan through a reduction in your EMIs, factoring in the transfer costs. If your savings appear to be significant, you have a case for transferring to another loan. Don’t forget that any MCLR-linked loan you move to will have a fluctuating interest rate. Currently, the interest rates are low, but at some point in the future, the rates will start increasing again due to factors such as inflation.

When It Makes Sense To Transfer
Here’s a look at the illustration below to understand when transferring your home loan makes sense.

Suppose you had taken a home loan for Rs 25 lakh for 20 years at an interest rate of 10.50% per annum. You want to transfer this loan to another bank offering you an MCLR-linked interest rate of 9.5% per annum. Now, consider the two different scenarios.

Conclusion – Shift, Only If There Are Savings
As the illustrations reveal, opting for a loan transfer in Scenario 2 is not an economical option for the borrower. It could lead to a loss, therefore the borrower can stick to his current repayment plan.

In fact, he can make the best use of the prevalent low interest rates and pre-pay on his loan. This would help him make significant progress in terms of repayment, and put him in a stronger position when the interest rates start rising again.

Conversely, when there’s a sizeable part of the loan tenure remaining, there may be significant long-term savings from moving to a loan with a lower interest rate.

In conclusion, do not make a hasty decision related to your home loan transfer. Calculate all the costs of transfer. You can take the help of various online calculators to calculate these costs and your savings. You could also approach your lender to ascertain these numbers.

(The writer is CEO, BankBazaar.com)

Source: https://goo.gl/Z7yHVV

ATM :: Why it makes more sense to switch your home loan after this interest rate cut

By Sunil Dhawan | ECONOMICTIMES.COM| Updated: Jan 04, 2017, 11.23 AM IST

ATM

The start of the new year may have something to cheer for the home loan borrowers. Several banks have significantly reduced the interest rates charged on these loans.

The State Bank of India (SBI) has lowered its home loan rate from 9.10 per cent to 8.60 per cent and ICICI Bank from 9.10 percent to 8.65 percent, HDFC at 8.7 per cent, with other banks set to follow suit. Effectively, home loan rate has come down by an average of about 0.4-0.5 per cent after these announcements.

Noticeably, SBI’s one-year MCLR is at 8 per cent which makes the spread on its home loan 0.6 per cent. So, even though the MCLR of banks have fallen, the actual home loans are not at MCLR. Still, the writing on the wall is clear – there is more room to cut home loan rates by the banks.

Borrowers on base rate should switch now
If not all then at least the old borrowers who have been servicing their EMI’s based on the erstwhile base rate system of lending, stand to benefit. Even though bank’s base rate hasn’t come down as much, they now have a stronger reason to switch to the current MCLR-based lending. With the recent interest rate cuts on loans by banks the differential between base rate at which old borrowers are servicing their loan and the current MCLR is widening.

For those who had taken loans after July 1, 2010, but before April 1, 2016, the loans are linked to the bank’s base rate. And for most of these borrowers, the home loan interest rate is around 10 per cent. After the recent rate cuts announced by banks, the average MCLR has fallen to about 8.75 percent or even lower. This differential of 1-1.25 percent in base rate and MCLR will help old borrowers to switch to MCLR and save on total interest outgo.

Why to switch now
The primary reason to switch from base rate to MCLR has to be the sluggishness seen in banks’ passing on the benefits of RBI rate cuts to borrowers. RBI’s repo rate cuts were not reflecting in the bank’s base rate but are a part of the factors that goes into calculating the bank’s MCLR so, the moment repo rate changed, MCLR was impacted.

Further, the MCLR takes into account the marginal cost of funds which includes the rate at which the bank raises deposits and other cost of borrowings. With banks flush with funds post demonetisation, the bank’s CASA deposits (current account-savings account) have swelled and have given the banks the leeway to go for such major rate cuts.

The base rate, on the other hand, has seen only marginal reduction since last 24 months. Post demonetisation, banks are expected to wait and see the impact once the restrictions on cash withdrawals are removed. If the funds don’t move out from the banking system in significant amounts, further rate cut is expected.

MCLR based borrowers
For the new home loan borrowers who have taken loan after April 1, 2016, there’s not much immediate benefit from the recent rate cuts. For most MCLR-linked home loan contracts, the banks reset the interest rate after 12 months for their home loan borrowers. So, if someone has taken home loan from a bank say in May, 2016, the next re-set date will be in May, 2017. Any revisions by RBI or banks will not impact their EMIs or the loan till the reset date

What’s MCLR mode of lending
A new method of bank lending called marginal cost of funds based lending rate (MCLR) was put in place for all loans, including home loans, given after April 1, 2016. Under the MCLR mode, the banks have to review and declare overnight, one month, three months, six months, one year, two years, three years rates each month.

Watchouts
In a falling interest rate scenario, quarterly or half-yearly could be a better option, provided the bank agrees. But when the interest rate cycle turns, the borrower will be at a disadvantage. After moving to the MCLR system, there is always the risk of any upward movement of interest rates before you reach the reset period. If the RBI raises repo rates, MCLR too, will move up.

Options for base rate borrowers
When the interest rate on your loan goes down banks, on their own, typically reduce the tenure automatically (instead of reducing EMI amount) and thereby, transfer the benefit of lower rate to the customers.

The base rate borrowers now have two options – switch to MCLR based lending with the same bank or else transfer i.e. get the loan refinanced from another bank on MCLR mode. One may also continue the loan on base rate, especially if the loan term is nearing the end.

The RBI has made it clear that banks should allow base rate borrowers to switch to MCLR. The existing loans can run till maturity or borrowers can switch to MCLR on mutually agreed terms.

Switching from base rate to MCLR within the same bank
It makes sense to switch if the difference between what you are paying and what the bank is offering now as MCLR is significant. And also in cases where the time for the home loan to finish is not near.

Switching loan from base rate to MCLR with another bank (refinancing)
If your bank is offering a high home loan interest rate (MCLR plus spread) then look for refinancing. Get the loan refinanced from a bank offering a lower interest rate. You may have to incur processing fees. However, banks are not allowed to charge foreclosure or full repayment charges. Other charges may include lawyer’s fees, mortgage charges, etc. Remember, the bank may ask you to buy a home loan insurance cover plan, which is not mandatory. Get the loan insured through a pure term insurance instead, in addition to any insurance that you already have.

Conclusion
Switching to MCLR in itself should help you save a substantial amount. In addition to switching the loan from base rate-linked to MCLR and thereby saving interest, prepare a systematic partial prepayment plan to further reduce the interest burden. It’s after all better to up your home-equity rather than making it a highly leveraged buy-out.

Source: https://goo.gl/6R5mh0

ATM :: Cut Your Home Loan Debt

By Munir Kulavoor | Published on 05 Aug 2016 | IntegraFinServe.in

ATM

Interest rates are likely to fall in the short term, even if the RBI leave the offical rate on hold there are many ways to cut your home loan debt. Here’s few ways to do it.

1. CHOOSE THE RIGHT LOAN

  • Many customers focus too much on the interest rate and fail to examine the fees and charges associated with the home loan.
  • Choosing the right home loan is the first step any borrower should take before signing the dotted line.
  • Lot of home loans from many HFCs & Banks might look cheap but they have high application fees or a honeymoon rate (for e.g. 1-2-3 year fixed rate) post which they might switch to a more expensive rate.
  • Comparing all the fees and charges associated with a loan including post disbursement (for e.g. fees for reset of interest rate or EMI) will give you truer cost of what you will really pay as it is a long term debt.

2. TIP THE LOAN

  • When you first avail a home loan it will feel like you’re not making any headway into it but, if you do the maths, paying more early on will help you save.
  • Start by cutting back on those coffees, unnecessary lunches and takeaway meals and tip an extra Rs.2000 a week into your loan.
  • If you calculate, on a Rs.50,00,000 30-year loan with a rate of 9.40 per cent, this Rs.8000 (tip) will save you more than 50,00,000 in interest repayments and shave thirteen years and six months off your loan’s duration.

3. HIGH FREQUENCY

  • Often the lender will put you onto monthly repayments but this is simple to change, all it requires is a change in ECS
  • Making more frequent for e.g. fortnightly home loan repayments will help you pay off the debt faster.
  • Halving your monthly repayment and paying it fortnightly is a neat trick that can save considerable interest over the life of the loan.
  • There are 26 fortnights in a year which means you will be make the equivalent of an extra month’s repayments than when you make 12 monthly repayments.

4. OFFSET/OVERDRAFT

  • Overdraft accounts (for e.g. Smart Home/Home Saver/ Maxgain) OR a daily transaction account linked to a home loan are a great way to reduce your overall interest and many customers opt to balance transfer to Banks that offer these products.
  • You can get your rental income (from investment properties), dividend (linked to Demat Account) paid into this account, and it offsets the interest repayments and you are paying down more principal.
  • SBI customers for instance like putting all their savings in Max Gain account to reduce the interest costs.
  • In the above example Rs.50,00,00,000 loan, if you have a windfall Rs.10,00,000 in say a Max Gain account you will only pay interest on Rs.40,00,000 thereby shaving off 183 or 51% of EMIs off the 30years loan.