Tagged: Home Buyer

NTH :: RBI makes home loans above Rs 75 lakh cheaper

Mayur Shetty | TNN | Updated: Jun 7, 2017, 03:10 PM IST | Times of India

NTH

MUMBAI: In a move that will encourage banks to lend more for housing in large cities and make high value home loans cheaper, the Reserve Bank of India reduced the risk weightage on home loans above Rs 75 lakh to 50% from 75% earlier.

“Considering the importance of the housing sector and given its forward and backward linkages to the economy, it has been decided as a countercyclical measure, to reduce the risk weight on certain categories. It has also been decided to reduce the standard asset provisioning on such loans,” RBI said in its monetary policy.

In its monetary policy review the RBI retained the repo rate at 6.25% and the reverse repo rate at 6%. The marginal standing facility (MSF) – an emergency funding facility continue to remain at 6.5% as also the cash reserve ratio of 4%.

In another move that will ease liquidity in the banking system by close to Rs 50,000 crore, Reserve Bank of India has reduced the statutory liquidity ratio (SLR) – the prescription for minimum holding of government securities. As against investing 20.5% of their deposits in gilts, banks will now have to invest only 20% with effect from June 24, 2017. RBI said that the reduction was aimed at allowing banks to comply with the international norms on liquidity coverage that come into effect from January 2019.

It was widely expected that the central bank would keep rates on hold. However, economists believed that RBI would ease its stance from `neutral’ to `accommodative’ to send a message that easy money conditions would prevail. The central bank however continued to maintain a neutral stance on the ground that easing of prices might be temporary. It also pointed out that fuel prices have been hiked since the inflation numbers were published and prices might rise further.

Source: https://goo.gl/6c974Q

NTH :: Availing government’s home loan subsidy

India Infoline News Service | Mumbai | July 30, 2017 11:44 IST
The National Housing Bank and Housing and Urban Development Corporation (HUDCO), which are the nodal agencies for the subsidy scheme, are implementing the scheme through various banks and housing finance institutions.

NTH

The Government of India launched a home loan subsidy scheme for urban dwellers in August 2016. The National Housing Bank and Housing and Urban Development Corporation (HUDCO), which are the nodal agencies for the subsidy scheme, are implementing the scheme through various banks and housing finance institutions.

The scheme offers a subsidy of 6.5% on the interest on home loan, subject to or a maximum amount of Rs 2.20 lakh, depending on the rate of interest. Hence, if the rate of interest on the home loan is, say, 8.5%, the actual rate of interest payable by the borrower is just 2.5% (8.5% less 6.5%).

The scheme can be availed by persons belonging to economically weaker section (EWS) whose annual household income is less than Rs 3 lakh and by those belonging to lower income group (LIG) whose annual income is between Rs 3 lakh and Rs 6 lakh. The maximum age limit for the scheme is 70 years. Also, the maximum loan amount eligible for subsidy is Rs 6 lakh and the maximum tenure of loan is 15 years. The maximum size of the house should not exceed 30 sq. metres (carpet) for EWS applicants and 60 sq. metres for persons belonging to LIG. The loan can be availed for the purpose of buying under-construction or ready-to-occupy home from a builder or for self-construction of a new house or extension of an existing house.

To be eligible, the borrower should not have any home in his/her own name or in the name of his/her family members.

Disclaimer: The contents herein is specifically prepared by ‘Dalal Street Investment Journal’, and is for your information & personal consumption only. India Infoline Limited or Dalal Street Investment Journal do not guarantee the accuracy, correctness, completeness or reliability of information contained herein and shall not be held responsible.

Source: https://goo.gl/qhdx85

ATM :: HFC Vs Bank: Where To Get That Home Loan

By Kavya Balaji | July 18, 2017 | Bank Bazaar

ATM

You have chosen your dream home and the project is approved by both banks and Housing Finance Companies (HFC). You need a Home Loan. Which lender should you go for? Are HFCs genuine? Are HFCs well regulated? Do they have fair loan practices? Will they provide standard services? All these questions might be playing in your mind. Here, we try to answer some of those questions for you.

Who supervises HFCs?

Unlike popular perception, HFCs are not unregulated. They are regulated by the National Housing Bank (NHB). HFCs need to register with NHB and the latter regulates and supervises them. There have been talks about the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) taking over but nothing is on the ground till now. However, NHB has been quite proactive in ensuring that Home Loan borrowers rest easy. These include steps like abolishing prepayment charges for floating rate loans, putting a cap on Loan To Value (LTV) ratio and making sure that HFCs have done proper provisioning for their bad loans. So, it is not right to say that HFCs are unregulated and are free to fix their own interest rates. They are well regulated and have standard industry practices when it comes to services.

What about their interest rates?

HFCs follow what is known as ‘Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (BPLR)’ model. They will fix an interest rate based on their average cost of funds. The loan rate that is fixed by HFCs will be at a discount to the BPLR.

There are two issues here. The BPLR is based on past cost of funds/interest rates and is not forward looking. Therefore, HFCs might be slow in passing on interest rate cuts to customers. Another point is that some of the HFCs might not be transparent with their BPLR.

Now, do banks offer better interest rates than HFCs? Sometimes, they do. This is because banks follow the Marginal Cost of Lending Rate (MCLR). Here, RBI ensures that the interest rate cuts made by the central bank are passed on to bank customers through the bank’s MCLR as quickly as possible.

However, note that there are HFCs that are competitive and do offer interest rates comparable to banks. Consider this: HDFC limited, one of the most popular HFCs, offers Home Loans starting at 8.5% while State Bank of India, the most popular bank, provides Home Loans that start at 8.65% unless you’re a woman. For women, SBI offers loans at 8.5%. HDFC has a standard loan process and the interest rates are transparent too.

So, HFC or bank?

You might think that at the end of the day, what matters is how quickly the firm/bank is able to pass on interest rate cuts as we are now on a downward interest rate cycle. Dies that mean you should choose a bank? Wrong!

Understand Home Loan is a long tenure loan. Most Home Loans stretch beyond 10 years. Given this scenario, when interest rates start increasing some years down the line, both banks and HFCs will pass on interest rate hikes quickly. Also, you might have to pay a heavy conversion fee for getting the lower rates now. Some HFCs actually charge a lower conversion fee than a bank.

Another important point that you need to understand is that interest rate cuts are passed on more quickly to new borrowers rather than existing ones. In case there are interest rate hikes, these will be passed on quickly to both new as well as old borrowers. So, passing on interest rates won’t matter as much in the long run. Then?

How expensive is that loan?

It doesn’t matter whether you take a loan from a HFC or a bank as long as you get competitive interest rates and terms. What would matter are the processing fees, prepayment fees and the foreclosure fees.

Typically Home Loans are taken by people in their 30s and are closed within 10 to 12 years. There are hardly a handful of people who let their Home Loan run till 20 years. This is because as people grow in their career, their salaries go up over a period of time and the EMIs seem smaller. So, they would rather repay the loan quickly then have a higher outgo in the form of interest. That is precisely why you need to check the prepayment and foreclosure fee. Heavy prepayment fees will mean an expensive loan. Same goes for foreclosure. There are several HFCs and banks that don’t charge fees for prepayment or foreclosure, even for a fixed rate loan. Consider this factor before zeroing in on a Home Loan provider. Some lenders have a waiting period before which you cannot prepay. Check this too, in case you want to use your yearly bonuses to prepay your Home Loan.

Most of the times, fixed rate loans become floating rate loans after a period of time. You have to go through the terms and conditions of the loan to see how interest rates might change. Another important point to note is whether a top up loan facility is available. Since a Home Loan is with collateral and the value of your home tends to go up over time, it is easy to get a top up loan on your Home Loan. They work out cheaper than Personal Loans. If your Home Loan provider is able to give you a top up loan on your Home Loan, it will be very useful if you need funds many years down the line.

So, there are multiple factors that you need to consider before choosing a Home Loan provider. Here’s a list:

  • Interest rate offered
  • Fixed or floating
  • Processing fee
  • Part-payment charges
  • Foreclosure fee
  • Conversion fee
  • Top-up loan facility
  • Service standards

Source : https://goo.gl/qf6Ypo

ATM :: Should one choose 6 or 12 months MCLR linked home loan?

By Sunil Dhawan, ECONOMICTIMES.COM|Jun 20, 2017, 10.41 AM IST

ATM

The competition amongst home loan lenders is getting aggressive. Last month in May, several top lending institutions had reduced their home loan interest rates and are expected to lower them further, given the push to the housing needs in the country.

The drop in the home loan interest rate was in spite of the RBI holding on to the repo rate for the last few months.

The new option
In addition to lowering the home loan interest rates, few banks have started offering borrowers, the option to choose between 6-month reset period and 12-month reset period while taking the MCLR linked home loan.

Since April 1, 2016, when the MCLR was introduced, almost all the banks kept the reset period at 12 months. However, of late few banks have started offering the option to choose the reset period of 6 months in addition to the 12-months period. ICICI Bank has recently started giving the option to choose between 6 months and 12 months reset period. Axis Bank and Kotak Bank are the two other banks offering the 6-month reset period only.

Should one choose 6 or 12 months MCLR linked home loan?

How it matters
In a 12-month reset period home loan, if one takes a home loan in June 2017 and the RBI cuts repo rate in August 2017, even though banks MCLR comes down in the same month, the effect of it for the borrower will be seen in June 2018 only i.e. after 12 months.

In a 6-month reset period home loan, if one takes a home loan in June 2017 and the RBI cuts repo rate in August 2017, even though banks MCLR comes down in the same month, the effect of it for the borrower will be seen in December 2017 only i.e. after 6 months. For the borrower, the MCLR of the bank in December 2017 will be applicable.

In effect, there is a waiting period for the borrowers to see an impact on the EMI’s. Therefore, MCLR linked flexible home loans are sort of ‘fixed’ for a certain period of the loan.

How to choose
Choosing between the two might be a tricky issue and the answer to it may not be a straight forward one. It will boil down to the movement of the interest rate, both in the short-term and in the long-term. “If interest rates are falling, opt for a shorter reset period so that you can avail reduced rates sooner. In case the interest rates are rising, opt for a longer reset period so that your loan burden does not go up for a longer period,” says Navin Chandan , Chief Business Development Officer, BankBazaar.

Rather than looking at the shorter term movement, a long term trend could be of help to a prospective borrower. “In a scenario where a decrease in interest rates is foreseen, it might be better to opt for a shorter reset period,” informs Ranjit Punja, CEO & Co-Founder, Creditmantri.com.

Kotak Mahindra Bank since the beginning is offering the 6-month reset period loans. Sumit Bali, Sr. EVP & Head, Personal Assets, Kotak Mahindra Bank says, “At Kotak Mahindra Bank, home loan rates are linked to 6-month MCLR, thereby the rate offered changes every six months depending on the MCLR movement. Our current 6-month MCLR rate stands at 8.5%. Presently, we offer rates up to MCLR + nil spread.”

However, here is an important point not to be overlooked. “Yes, it’s a fact that home loan rates under 6-month MCLR will be revised and get reset in every six months compared to every year in 12-month MCLR, but the catch here is the markup to the MCLR, which actually adds to the effective lending rate, says Rishi Mehra, CEO, Wishfin.com.

According to Mehra, “You need not only to glance at both the MCLRs (Bank’s 6 and 12-month MCLR) but also the markup. Add the MCLR and markup in both 6-month and 12-month MCLR, and opt the one that has a lower lending rate on offer. For example, ICICI Bank offers a home loan of up to Rs 30 lakh at 6-month MCLR of 8.15% and 1-year MCLR of 8.20%. But the effective lending rate comes out to be equal in both the cases.”

Also, the quantum of loan matters. “Another factor to look at is the quantum of the loan up to which 6-month MCLR is applicable. In the case of ICICI Bank, 6-month MCLR is available for a loan of up to Rs 30 lakh only,” informs Mehra.

Can the reset period be changed
Bringing a change in the reset period may not always be an easy task. Better, if as a borrower, one gets clarity from the lender at the initial stages of taking a loan. “The reset period is typically pre-defined but it might be modified after a discussion with the lender,” informs Punja.

Can the markup change during the tenure
Let’s says, a customer takes a home loan at a certain markup. On the reset date ( after 6 or 12 months as the case may be), there is a possibility that the bank’s markup has changed. “The lenders can make changes in the markup, which gets influenced by the cost of funds to be borne by the banks. As these costs can vary from time to time, there would be changes in the markup accordingly,” says Mehra.

EMIs get reset periodically
In the base-rate era, when RBI reduced the policy rate, both the existing and the new borrowers, expected a fall in the rates with immediate effect. It’s a different story that banks delayed any such rate cut but were prompt in raising them whenever RBI increased the repo rate. There was, however, no reset period in the base rate era.

However, in the MCLR based lending, the interest rate of the home loan (and therefore the EMI’s) gets re-priced on a periodical basis. As per the RBI rules, “the periodicity of reset shall be one year or lower. The exact periodicity of reset shall form part of the terms of the loan contract.” Predicting the interest rate movement will be highly speculating in nature.

Refinancing a MCLR linked loan
In case, after few years of servicing the loan, one finds the interest rate or the markup too high or would like to switch to another reset period, refinancing the loan with another lender is an option. Mehra says, “Yes, you can switch the MCLR linked home loan to another bank at any time. The good thing is that you can do that without paying any foreclosure charges to the existing lender as it is a floating rate loan. However, you may have to pay a processing fee at 0.5%-1% on the transferred amount. A stamp duty at 0.20%-0.50% can also be charged by the lender.

The possibility of refinancing could, however, be remote. “With respect to changes in MCLR and reset period, on a case by case to basis, lenders might be willing to adjust your interest rates provided you have a healthy credit history. Higher the loan outstanding and better the credit history, the existing lender is likely to be flexible, and lower overall interest rates in order to retain the loan, rather than lose it to competition,” says Punja.

Conclusion
As far as choosing between 6 and 12 months reset period is concerned, look for flexibility and options while selecting and negotiating with the lender. “The offering of home loan on 6-month MCLR is a new phenomenon. So, you need to wait till you understand the pattern of rate offering under 6-month MCLR,” says Mehra.

Whatever reset period one chooses, it’s important to have a systematic partial prepayment plan in place to lower interest burden on the home loan. After all, the early you finish the home loan, higher will be one’s own equity in the house.

Source: https://goo.gl/ZKCf7M

 

ATM :: GST rollout, launch in India: How Goods and Services Tax affects your home loan, house construction, renovation and furnishing budget

GST rollout, launch in India: Here are some impact areas on all household budgets right from purchase of a house to furnishing of the house and purchase of other necessities:
Updated: June 30, 2017 2:38 PM | Financial Express

ATM

GST rollout, launch in India: Finally, India is on the verge of witnessing a historic change from its current indirect taxation regime to the Goods and Services Tax (GST) regime with effect from 1 July 2017, with a grand ceremony on the night of 30 June 2017. Even though Congress, TMC and some other political parties have decided to boycott the event, it is going be a grand affair with PM Narendra Modi as the star speaker. The event will start at 11 pm on June 30.

GST aims at eliminating the multiplicity of taxes and removing cascading of taxes which leads to a higher tax incidence on customers today. With an intent to curtail the inflation, the Government has taken various measures viz. finalization of rates which are aligned to existing rate structure for most items and introducing an anti-profiteering clause in the GST law.

Here are some impact areas on all household budgets right from purchase of a house to furnishing of the house and purchase of other necessities:

Impact on renovation/construction budget of your house
Currently, in a typical construction contract, contractor’s price includes heavy incidence of Central Excise duty, Entry Tax, Central Sales Tax on material and Service tax on services used in construction which is ultimately passed on to customers in the form of higher prices.

The contactors shall have to pass on the benefits of lower tax burden under the GST regime to the customers by way of reduced prices as the contractors will be eligible for credit of GST paid on the material and services used in construction.

This benefit on account of GST will positively impact the budget on common households.

Impact on interior decorator services
Interior decorator services to get dearer by 3% since GST will be charged at 18% vis-à-vis current Service tax rate of 15%.

Impact on loan processing charges of banks
GST will be applicable on financial services, at 18 per cent vis-à-vis the current Service tax rate of 15%. Be ready to shell out more money as taking loans is going to get expensive.

Also, along with expenditure on upgradation of house, you might also want to invest in latest technology or home furniture. GST will have a bearing on the prices of such goods as well.

Impact on Electronic Appliances
Currently, the average tax incidence on most of the electronic appliances/ items is approximately 25-26% (including CST and other local taxes). GST on household electronic appliance like fridge, washing machine, vacuum cleaner etc. has been fixed at 28% under GST. Likely increase in the tax burden of customer by 2-3%.

Also, electronic segment faces stiff competition with a lot of new players and less established brands who are mostly based in excise-free zones and are awaiting clarity on how the present excise exemption will work, post GST. Therefore, impact on the products of such players may be known only after a few months.

Impact on other items
Common household furniture, mattress to attract higher GST rate of 28%. Positive impact on LEDs and carpets due to a lower GST rate (please see below).

GST tax, GST tax rates, Goods and Services Tax, what is GST, GST meaning

Impact on daily necessities
There should not be any inflationary impact on account of GST on daily necessities as most of the items viz. unprocessed cereals like rice, wheat, essential items like milk, vegetables have been specifically exempt from GST.

All in all, GST should impact the household budgets in a positive manner, not only from a rate perspective but also on pricing of various products, albeit in a long run.

*Rates mentioned above are basis the general rate available for such category of products and for illustrative purposes only. Actual rates may vary depending upon the specifics of a product and state wise VAT rates.

(By Achal Chawla, Tax Partner, EY India. Views expressed are personal)

Source: https://goo.gl/eB4kBD

ATM :: Impact of GST on homebuyers

GST may reduce the cost of houses if it is at a rate below the current applicable taxes that are levied by the central and state governments
Ashwini Kumar Sharma | First Published: Mon, Apr 24 2017. 05 31 PM IST | LiveMint.com

ATM

The biggest reform in the indirect tax regime is set to get implemented very soon. Instead of different types of taxes—central, state, local and so on—soon there will be only one tax: the Goods and Services Tax (GST). Like any other sector, real estate will also come under the ambit of GST. However, as of now, there is lack of clarity on various aspects such as whether the rate of GST will remain at par with current applicable taxes and whether affordable or low-cost housing will remain out of the GST’s ambit. Read on to know what impact GST will have on the real estate sector in India.

Service Tax
When you buy an under-construction house, service tax is levied on a certain percentage of the total value of the property, which is considered the cost of construction. Cost of land is excluded from service tax. To do this, income tax provisions allow abatement to the tune of 75% on under-construction properties costing less than Rs1 crore; hence, service tax is calculated on 25% of the gross value. And, 70% abatement is allowed for properties costing more than Rs1 crore: service tax is levied on 30% of the value.

Given that service tax of 15% is charged only on the construction cost, the effective rate on the entire value of a property costing below Rs1 crore is 3.75% (i.e., 15% * 25% of the property value), and for a property above Rs1 crore, the effective rate is 4.5% (15% * 30% of the property value). Thus, if you buy a property at Rs80 lakh, you will have to pay Rs3 lakh (3.75% of Rs80 lakh) as service tax. And, if the property was Rs1.6 crore, service tax would be Rs7.2 lakh (4.5% of Rs1.6 crore). Once GST gets implemented, “Payment of service tax on the properties under construction does not arise. It will be replaced with GST,” said Kunal Wadhwa, partner-indirect taxes, PwC. Besides that, “Existing abatements under the service tax laws are also to be done away with post implementation of GST,” added Wadhwa. So, it is likely that tax will be charged on the actual construction value.

However, the concern is whether the GST rate would be higher than the prevailing service tax rate or lower. “It is expected to remain around 12% or lower than 15% (the current applicable service tax rate). It will not be on the higher side at around 18%,” said Abhishek Rastogi, partner, Khaitan & Co. If the GST rate remains on the lower side, it will bring down the overall cost of houses.

Value added Tax
Some states like Haryana and Delhi also charge value added tax (VAT) on under-construction properties, which is again borne by a homebuyer. However, once GST gets implemented “the current composition schemes for developers under VAT laws of respective states would come to an end,” said Naveen Wadhwa, deputy general manager, Taxmann.com. VAT is a state subject and varies between 1% and 5% of the property value. However, “There is a lot of litigation going forward on this account,” said Nangia. There are many contentious issues for both developers and homebuyers regarding VAT. Some cases have also reached the apex court. Once GST gets implemented “it will simplify tax structure and reduce the scope for litigation, however this may increase the cost of real estate in states that never had VAT,” said Nangia.

Stamp Duty
A homebuyer has to pay stamp duty to get the property registered. Even after GST, “Stamp duty will continue, as GST will not subsume stamp duty levied by government,” said Wadhwa.

Stamp duty is calculated as a percentage of the agreed value of the property, or the circle rate (the minimum price on which a property can be transacted, which is decided by the government), whichever is greater. In addition to stamp duty, typically 1% of the value of a property is charged as registration fee for registration of property documents (sale deed). In some states, if a property is bought in the name of a woman, the stamp duty levied is lower. For instance, in Delhi, properties registered in the name of women attract 4% stamp duty, compared to 6% otherwise. However, in case of joint ownership, where the property is bought jointly in the name of a man and a woman, buyers have to pay stamp duty of 5%, in case of Delhi.

In some states, stamp duty also depends on the region in which a sale deed is executed. For instance, in Haryana a man is required to pay 8% stamp duty in urban areas and 6% in rural areas, while women have to pay 6% in urban areas and 4% in rural areas.

“The Task Force on Goods and Services Tax recommended in the Thirteenth Finance Commission that real estate sector should be integrated into the GST framework by subsuming the stamp duty on immovable properties levied by the states, to facilitate input credit and eliminate the cascading effect,” said Nangia.

But “due to political and economic considerations, stamp duty—which is a good contributor of revenue to state government—is not subsumed in the GST framework for the time being,” added Nangia.

As of now, taxes and duties can increase the cost of property by 15-18% for homebuyers. After GST gets implemented, whether the cost of houses will come down or increase, will depend on the rate at which GST is charged and whether there will be any abatement or not.

Source: https://goo.gl/mhvBpB

ATM :: Planning to invest in home? Here is how you can raise your down payment

With interest rate-cuts and increased liquidity with banks following the demonetisation, loan products have more accessible.
Adhil Shetty | Published: May 11, 2017 4:02 PM | Financial Express

ATM

Consumers with healthy credit scores today would be receiving loan offers aplenty. With interest rate-cuts and increased liquidity with banks following the demonetisation, loan products have more accessible. Yet availing a home loan for the very first time remains a complex experience that loan seekers view with trepidation.

There are often misconceptions about what a home loan can do, and what it costs. For instance, you may be of the belief that the loan granted will match the property price. That is untrue, as financial establishments expect you to pay the margin amount.

The margin amount is another term for down payment for your new home. It could be anything between 15% and 20% of the home’s net value. For a first time home buyer, it is no easy task raising this money.

Here are some ways to help.
1. Strategic savings
Nothing beats strategic savings and for this you need to start your planning early. It involves you visualizing your long-term fund needs—including the need to buy a home—and beginning to save and invest accordingly. Begin with simple and accessible investment tools such as mutual funds or recurring deposits. Slowly and surely, you’ll be able to build your deposit over time. You can be efficient at this by locking in your savings at the start of the month. The earlier you start, the sooner you build this fund for your down payment.

2. Take loans but exercise restraint
There could be a situation where you are in urgent need of funds for the down payment. You could consider taking a personal loan to meet the need. Yet, you need to do this in a controlled manner. Having an existing loan will reduce your ability to take on, and repay, additional loans such as a home loan. You would find your finances stretched as you attempt to pay two EMIs at once. This isn’t an ideal situation to be in and is recipe for a financial disaster, in case you were to temporarily lose your ability to generate income. Therefore any loans for down payments need to be taken thoughtfully, and settled as soon as possible to reduce monthly EMI liabilities.

3. Mortgage another property
If you are confident that your current income can take care of EMIs of more than one loan, you could consider a loan against property. You can claim this loan against several options. For example, an existing property or home could be mortgaged. You could also claim it against assets such as shares, jewelry, PPF account, and LIC policies. There also exists the option of taking a loan against rent.

4. Withdraw from your PF account
As per the new EPFO norms, you are now allowed to withdraw up to 90% of your EPF corpus. Not just that, you could also withdraw from this corpus to pay for your EMIs. This scheme was recently implemented keeping in line with the Housing For All initiative of the central government. A word of caution: your PF corpus is meant to help you generate a pension income in retirement, so if you intend to redeem it for a property purchase, you must replenish it soon, or create a backup pension fund to meet your future needs.

5. Deferred down payment
You have the option of requesting a deferred down payment when purchasing a house from a well-known property developer. Under this, you will have the choice of dividing the down payment into multiple instalments. These instalments can be paid over a jointly agreed period of time. Let us say that you have to make a down payment of Rs. 10 lakh. Ask the builder for a time frame of five months to pay Rs. 2 lakh per month.

6. Liquidate your investments
Before you decide to make a property purchase, take stock of your savings, investments and assets. Anything from a vehicle to a part of a property you own can be liquidated for a down payment. Bank deposits, gold, mutual funds, shares etc. can be disposed. This should be carefully done so as to not disturb other financial objectives.

7. Approach an NBFC/ HFC
Non-Banking Financial Companies (NBFCs) and House Finance Companies (HFCs) provide loans that can help you cover a larger part of your fund requirement. For example, they may provide a loan to cover your registration and home repair costs as well. The entitlement of the loan, of course, will be calculated on the basis of your ability to repay.

Always remember to not act in a hurry. Think long and wise about the route you are taking to raise the down payment for your house. It is also advisable to wait and let an offer go if you cannot make the down payment, as there will always be another good offer in the future.

(The writer is CEO, BankBazaar.com)

Source : https://goo.gl/8ixiEW