Tagged: Base Rate

NTH :: SBI extends home loan processing fee waiver to March-end, cuts base rate by 30 bps

PTI | Published Date: Jan 02, 2018 07:52 am | FirstPost.com

NTH

Mumbai: In a major boost to homebuyers, the country’s largest lender State Bank of India has extended the processing fee waiver till March-end and also reduced the base rate by a sharp 30 basis points to 8.65 percent.

The reduction in base rate, effective from Monday, is going to bring relief for nearly 80 lakh customers of the bank whose loans are still linked to the base rate and not the marginal cost of funds-based lending rates (MCLR).

Flushed with excess liquidity, SBI had announced processing fee waiver for auto and home loans late August. In fact, since last fiscal, and especially after the November 2016 note-ban, all the banks have been saddled with excess liquidity amidst continuing degrowth in industrial credit.

For the first time in over two years, credit uptake by corporates entered the positive terrain but with a paltry 1 percent growth in November this year. “We’ve decided to extend the ongoing waiver on home loan processing fees till March 31, 2018 for new customers and others looking to switch their existing loans to us,” SBI said in a statement on Monday.

Managing director for retail and digital banking P K Gupta said that with stability returning to the realty space after the implementation of the Real Estate Act (Rera), he sees lots of demand for home loans going ahead. “With most states having the realty regulator Rera now, stability has returned to the market in terms of project approvals. The teething troubles of the initial Rera months are behind the market. So, we foresee lots of demand for home loans. So, we think this is the right time to continue with that waiver to enable people for buy homes,” Gupta said in a concall.

The bank revised down the base rate to 8.65 percent for existing customers from 8.95 percent, while the BPLR (benchmark prime lending rate) is down from 13.70 percent to 13.40 percent.

The bank, however, did not change the marginal cost of funds-based lending rate (MCLR). The one-year MCLR of the bank stands at 7.95 percent.

“We had done the rate review in the last week of December, and based on whatever deposits rates we had, our base rate was brought down by 30 basis points to 8.65 percent now,” Gupta said.

The move is going to give nearly 80 lakh customers of SBI who were on the old lending rate regimes and have not moved to MCLR. Banks review MCLR on a monthly basis, while the base rate revision happens once a quarter.

“The MCLR was reduced earlier also as the gap between MCLR and base rate had become quite wide. This reduction will help in reducing that gap,” he said.

Due to weak transmission of policy rate by banks under the base rate system, the Reserve Bank had introduced the MCLR from 1 April, 2016.

With the banks not fully passing on the rate cuts that the central bank has done in the past two years, the regulator is not happy even with the base rate regime and has mooted an external benchmark to better reflect market realities and speedier transmission.

Gupta said the current revision of base rate will ensure transmission of the policy rate cuts in the recent past.

Source: https://goo.gl/cQ2sV2

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NTH :: SBI cuts base rate by 0.15% to 9.10%; your car, home loan EMIs set to decline

Business PTI | Apr, 03 2017 18:53:46 IST | Firtspost.com

NTH

New Delhi – Ahead of the RBI monetary policy this week, the country’s largest bank SBI has reduced benchmark lending rate by 0.15 percent to 9.10 percent, a move that will lower EMIs for borrowers.

Base rate or the minimum lending rate of the bank has been reduced from 9.25 percent to 9.10 percent effective April 1. The bank has also reduced its base rate by 0.05 percent to 9.25 percent.

Similarly, benchmark prime lending rate (BPLR) has also been reduced by similar percentage points to 13.85 percent from 14 percent.

With the reduction, EMIs for the new as well as existing borrowers who have taken housing and car loans at base rate will come down by at least 0.15 percent.

The new rate is effective from the date the bank merged five of its associates and Bharatiya Mahila Bank putting it on the list of top 50 large banks of the world.

The total customer base of the bank has reached 37 crore with a branch network of around 24,000 and nearly 59,000 ATMs across the country.

The merged entity has a deposit base of more than Rs 26 lakh crore and advances of Rs 18.50 lakh crore. It is to be noted that the SBI has made changes in signage and logo, with its iconic keyhole set against the background of inky blue.

There have been minor changes in the design and colour of SBI’s new look from April 1.

The background to the SBI signboard has been changed from white to inky blue while the SBI logo or the monogram is a few shades lighter than the existing blue.

Source: https://goo.gl/JSytJz

ATM :: Still paying interest on home loan at old rates? Cut EMI by switching to MCLR-linked rate now

By Narendra Nathan, ET Bureau| Mar 20, 2017, 04.06 PM IST | Economic Times

ATM

Just like bank depositors, those borrowing from banks also need to be alert in order to protect themselves against unnecessary charges. Given below are the most common areas where banks tend to overcharge customers.

If you compare the interest costs of your friends and relatives on bank loans—housing, auto, personal loan, etc.—you will realise that they vary drastically. And these costs not only vary across banks, but across customers of the same bank—and not because of varying customer credit scores. Some banks have been offering loans at cheaper rates to new customers, while charging old customers a higher rate. “Banks continue to follow the discriminatory practice of offering differential rates for existing and new customers and this should stop,” says Ramganesh Iyer, Co-founder, Fisdom.

As the banking regulator, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) should stop this discriminatory practice, which it is partly responsible for creating. The RBI introduced the MCLR (marginal cost based lending rate) method, effective April 2016, to enable a faster transmission of rate cuts to bank customers, replacing the base rate method that was being used by banks to set their lending rates—earlier the base rate had replaced the less transparent prime lending rate (PLR). Now, borrowers who took loans 4-5 years back, and did not ask their bank to switch to the newer regime, are still linked to the PLR. Those who borrowed when the base rate became the benchmark are stuck with the base rate. Now, while banks are giving new loans at cheaper rates, based on MCLR, old customers are still paying higher rates.

“Since banks offer different rates, it is better to visit some common aggregator and understand the lowest rates available in the market. This will help you bargain better with your bank,” says Dipak Samanta, CEO, iServeFinancial.

To reduce your interest outgo, you need to shift your loan from base rate or PLR to MCLR. Shifting to MCLR now is a good move, say experts. “Though RBI’s stand is neutral now, rates may not go up from current levels. In fact, they may come down later—after an year,” says Balwant Jain, investment expert. Bear in mind though, in an upward moving interest rate regime, MCLR will move up faster than base rates, just like it falls faster in a reducing interest rate regime.

Still paying interest on home loan at old rates? Cut EMI by switching to MCLR-linked rate now

Loan reset charges
There are two types of loans: Fixed and floating rate. Floating rate loans are supposed to mirror the rise and fall in interest rates set by the RBI. But this rarely happens. While banks increase rates immediately, they are very slow in cutting them. The introduction of new benchmarks has also turned out to banks’ advantage. They charge customers for shifting from one benchmark to another— from PLR regime to base rate regime to MCLR regime now. The charges are levied to meet the expenses involved in drafting and registering new agreements—stamp duty, registration charges, etc. Though these expenses vary across states, ordinarily they won’t be more than 0.2% of the outstanding amount. However, some banks try to profit from this also by charging around 0.5%.

Should you go for a reset even if it involves a small charge? Yes. The amount you save will be significantly higher over the years. To illustrate, consider the case of a home loan borrower with Rs 50 lakh outstanding loan amount and a 15-year tenure. A 1% fall in interest— from 9.5% to 8.5%—will bring his EMI from down from Rs 52,200 to Rs 49,250, a reduction of Rs 2,950 per month. A total saving of Rs 5.31 lakh—significantly higher than the reset fee of Rs 25,000 even at the maximum rate of 0.5%. You may be able to get this reset cost down by negotiating with your bank. A threat of shifting to another bank often works. “Another way is to approach the branch manager. Based on the value of your relationship, they can reduce or even waive charges,” says Samanta. The ‘value of relationship’ here is crucial. If you have multiple relationships with the bank—savings bank account, credit card, other loans, investment, etc.—you have a valuable relationship and will receive a favourable treatment.

Source : https://goo.gl/FBRCpI

ATM :: Did you know: most new home loans ride on 1-year MCLR

When banks cut MCLR, they usually do it for all the five MCLR baskets
Vivina Vishwanathan | Tue, Oct 11 2016. 04 35 PM IST | LiveMint

ATM

After the Reserve Bank of India cut repo rate by 25 basis points (bps), some banks such as Indian Bank and Canara Bank Ltd cut their marginal cost of funds based lending rate (MCLR) and their base rate. State Bank of India Ltd (SBI), the country’s largest lender, had cut its MCLR before the monetary policy announcement. MCLR is the new benchmark lending rate at which banks lend to new borrowers. The existing borrowers are still on base rate and have the option to switch to MCLR. Currently, MCLR is 5-10 bps lower than base rate. One basis point is one-hundredth of a percentage point.

MCLR-linked loan

When banks cut MCLR, they usually do it for all the five MCLR baskets. For instance, when ICICI Bank reduced its MCLR by 5 bps, its overnight MCLR and 1-month MCLR came down to 8.85% each, the 3-month MCLR to 8.95%, 6-month MCLR to 9.00% and 1-year MCLR to 9.05%.

Out of the five MCLRs that banks publish on their websites, it is either the 6-month or the 1-year MCLR that is used as the benchmark rate for new home loan borrowers. For instance, SBI has benchmarked its home loan to 1-year MCLR, whereas Kotak Mahindra Bank Ltd has linked it to 6-month MCLR. Kotak Mahindra Bank’s 6-month MCLR is 9.20% and SBI’s 1-year MCLR is 9.05%. This also means there will be a reset clause in the loan document, which is linked to the tenure of the MCLR your home loan is linked to. In case of SBI it will be 1-year and for Kotak Mahindra Bank it will be 6 months.

Things to remember

All MCLR-linked loans come with a spread, which is the margin that you have to pay above the MCLR. For instance, ICICI Bank offers 1-year MCLR at 9.05%. For a home loan of up to Rs5 crore, the spread is 25 bps, which means your home loan interest rate will be 9.30%. For home loans above Rs5 crore, the spread is 50 bps above the 1-year MCLR.

Usually the spread is higher for larger loans.

Source: https://goo.gl/H65Q9a

ATM :: MCLR may not help retail borrowers too much

Harsh Roongta | Apr 10, 2016 10:06 PM IST | Business Standard

ATM

The marginal cost-based lending rate or MCLR that has kicked in from April 1 replaces the base rate system that was introduced with much fanfare six years ago.

In theory, MCLR is fairly straightforward. The bank declares its MCLR every month, the benchmark rate, based on the latest interest rate it pays on deposits in that month, with a couple of additional items.

Borrowers are charged a little above this rate as the bank will charge a ‘spread’. This will be pre-fixed at the time of giving the loan and cannot be changed easily. In theory, once the bank reduces its deposit rates, the MCLR will come down and since the ‘spread’ is pre-fixed, so will the interest rate for borrowers.

But, there are issues. For one, unlike the base rate, there will be a multitude of rates such as overnight, monthly, quarterly, six-monthly and yearly. Banks are free to have more such rates. Each of these rates will be announced every month by each bank.

Then, apart from the deposit rate, there are a whole host of subjective factors applicable in each calculation and there can well be a situation where these multiple rates move in opposite directions. That is, the monthly rate might be down but the annual rate goes up.

Also, the applicability of the reset date has been left to the discretion of the banks. So, State Bank of India (SBI) and ICICI Bank have chosen to go for a yearly reset of interest rates for home loans, whereas Kotak Mahindra Bank has chosen a six-month reset and some other banks have chosen quarterly resets. The implications of this difference in reset periods will only be known in the future. In the current context, it implies that even if SBI drops MCLR in May, the home loan borrower will get the benefit only after one year.

In addition, the MCLR system does not apply to housing finance companies such as Housing Development Finance Corporation and LIC Housing and other finance companies as well as non-banking finance companies. And, if you want to shift to the new mechanism, you may have to pay a fee.

The good thing: Both floating and fixed rates are clearly defined – an excellent move.

Based on these, let’s make some predictions:

  • Three to seven year loans like car loans and personal loans, currently given on a floating rate basis by public sector banks (most private banks are already providing these on a fixed-rate basis), will shift to a fixed rate regime. This will help banks charge a prepayment penalty. It is also possible that banks may stop offering the floating rate option for such loans or make it more expensive.
  • Even in the home loans segment, we shall see many hybrid loans where the initial period will be a fixed rate for at least three years, to enable the banks to charge a stiff prepayment penalty in the event that the consumer wants to prepay or shift his loan during this period. However, these types of loans have never been popular with the borrowers.
  • Quite a few banks are going to keep the reset clause at 12 months from the date of disbursement. That will enable them to deny the benefit of the lower rate to the borrowers for at least a year. This is a double-edged weapon as in the future, this will also prevent banks from increasing the rates for a year despite an intermediate increase in interest rates. Maybe, at that time, they will change the reset period for new consumers. Of course, nothing but inertia prevents the consumer from shifting his loan without a prepayment penalty, even within the year.

Source: http://goo.gl/r1ow0d

ATM :: How MCLR will affect your home loan

For new borrowers, home loan rates will be automatically reset either yearly or every six months
Vivina Vishwanathan | Last Modified: Mon, Apr 04 2016. 10 30 PM IST | LiveMint

ATM

State Bank of India (SBI), India’s largest lender, was the first to announce the new marginal cost-based lending rate (MCLR), on 1 April 2016. This is the new benchmark lending rate and it replaces the base rate for new borrowers. SBI has introduced seven MCLRs for periods ranging between overnight and three years. While MCLR will be the benchmark rate for new borrowers, for existing borrowers, the base rate regime will continue.

Here’s what the new rate means, and how it affects you.

What is MCLR?

MCLR is the new benchmark lending rate at which banks will now lend to new borrowers. Till 31 March 2016, banks used the base rate as the benchmark rate to lend.

MCLR is built on four components—marginal cost of funds, negative carry on account of cash reserve ratio (CRR), operating costs and tenor premium.

Marginal cost of funds is the marginal cost of borrowing and return on net worth for banks. The operating cost includes cost of providing the loan product including cost of raising funds. Tenor premium arises from loan commitments with longer tenors. According to brokerage and investment group CLSA, the source of funding for a bank is based on actual domestic funding mix. MCLR is closely linked to the actual deposit rates.

“If one-year term deposit is at 7.50%. Then one-year MCLR will be 7.50% plus CRR, operation cost and tenor premium,” said Ashutosh Khajuria, executive director, Federal Bank Ltd.

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has asked banks to set at least five MCLR rates—overnight, one month, three month, six month and one year. Besides these, banks are free to set rates for longer durations as well. The rates have to be reviewed on a monthly basis, but banks that don’t have the capacity to do monthly reviews on can do so quarterly till March 2017.

MCLR-linked loans will be reset for a maximum of one year. So, you will have a new interest rate on your home loan at a pre-decided time and for a maximum period of one year.

Banks are also allowed to determine a spread that is higher than MCLR. Depending on your credit profile, banks will decide this. “The spread will be decided based on credit risk and tenor. For credit risk, in case of an individual borrower, we will look at Cibil rating. Depending on the credit worthiness of the customer, we will set the spread above MCLR. Currently, the spread is in the range of 25-60 basis points (bps) for home loans,” K.V.S. Manian, president-corporate, institutional and investment banking, Kotak Mahindra Bank Ltd. One basis point is one-hundredth of a percentage point.

Not all loans will come under this rate. For instance, loans covered by government schemes where banks have to charge interest rates as per the scheme are exempted from being linked to MCLR as the benchmark for determining interest rate.

How does it work?

If you plan to take a floating rate home loan, your loan will now be linked to MCLR. Most banks have announced five to seven rates. For home loans, banks will either use the six-month MCLR or the one-year MCLR as the benchmark rate. Therefore, from now, all floating rate loan agreements will have a reset clause at a pre-specified interval. “Banks can decide on the tenor that they want to use to reset for longer-term loans such as home loans. We have decided to reset home loan interest rates at a six-month frequency. Hence, the six-month MCLR will be applicable for home loans,” said Manian. Kotak Mahindra Bank has announced 9.40% as its six-month MCLR and the home loan will be reset every six months in case of any changes in MCLR. If you have a home loan, the bank will reset the rate automatically at a pre-specified date.

However, banks such as SBI and ICICI Bank Ltd have set one-year MCLR as the benchmark for home loans. For instance, for salaried individuals, ICICI Bank has set a floating rate home loan at one-year MCLR of 9.20% with a spread of 25 bps for loans of up to Rs.5 crore. So, the interest rate will be 9.45%. The bank’s website stated that this will be valid till 30 April 2016. Though the MCLR is reviewed monthly, your home loan will be reset every year automatically, depending on the agreement with the bank. For instance, if you take a Rs.30-lakh loan on 1 April this year, one-year MCLR is at 9.20% and spread on it is 25 bps, your home loan will be 9.45%. You will pay instalments at this rate for the next one year. If on 1 April 2017, one-year MCLR gets revised to 9.15%, your home loan interest rate will get reset at 9.40% (MCLR of 9.15% plus spread of 25 bps). Accordingly, your instalment or loan tenor may change.

According to a report by Ambit Capital Pvt. Ltd, RBI gave banks the provision of a reset period to partly smoothen the impact of changing rates on banks’ margins (as deposits re-price with a lag, reset periods allow bank to adjust the timing of loan pricing). As the concept of reset period contravenes with the RBI’s objective of quick transmission of monetary policy, the RBI has capped reset period at one year.

Though retail loans are likely to be set at six months to one-year MCLR tenors, corporate loans may be set at shorter tenors. “Due to complexity in the retail product, a pre-specified reset has been decided. When it comes to corporate loans, there is a possibility to negotiate across the multiple sets of rates that are available,” said Manian.

Can an existing borrower who is on a base rate regime move to MCLR? According to RBI, existing loans and credit limits linked to base rate will continue till repayment or renewal, and banks will have to continue publishing base rates as well. Existing borrowers can move to MCLR-linked loans at mutually acceptable terms and these loans will not be treated as foreclosure of existing facility.

What you should know

The MCLR-linked home loan rate is currently marginally lower than a base rate-linked loan. For instance, SBI was offering home loans between 9.50% and 9.55% till 31 March. From 1 April, the rate is lower by 10 bps and ranges between 9.40% and 9.45%.

According to the Ambit report, new MCLRs are not so different from base rates: “…even if benchmark rates would have fallen, the effective loan pricing for borrowers might not have changed much. This is because banks could change spreads over benchmark rates,” the report noted.

Home loan rates will now depend on the bank’s choice of reset period—six-month or one-year MCLR rate and spread rather than one common base rate and spread. According to a Centrum Broking Ltd report, while MCLR is intended to ensure effective policy transmission, past studies, including references to global banks, suggest limited rate transmission to end-user. Hence, its effectiveness in the longer run will need to be assessed, the report noted.

Existing borrowers should wait for the new system of calculation to settle before deciding to switch loans.

Source : http://goo.gl/ljh3NV

NTH :: SBI announces new lending rate structure

The new rate setting structure, which asks banks to price loans based on the marginal cost of deposits rather than average cost, comes into effect from 1 April
Aparna Iyer | Last Modified: Thu, Mar 31 2016. 11 12 AM IST | LiveMint

NTH

Mumbai: State Bank of India (SBI), the country’s largest lender, on Thursday announced its marginal cost of funds-based lending rate (MCLR). The new rate setting structure, which asks banks to price loans based on the marginal cost of deposits rather than average cost, comes into effect from 1 April.

At SBI, the MCLR for loans upto one year maturity will be lower than its current base rate of 9.30% while those on two year and above maturity will be marginally above its base rate.

According to the statement on the bank’s website, the MCLR for overnight loans will be 8.95%, for one-month at 9.05% and for three-month at 9.10%.

The MCLR on 6-month loans will be 9.15% and for one year loans the rate would be 9.2%, the bank said.

Further the bank’s MCLR for two year loans would be at 9.3%. Loans with three year maturity would carry an MCLR of 9.35%, the bank said.

To be sure, the bank will add the credit risk premium of individual borrowers to the MCLR for the final loan rate it would charge.The rates take effect from Friday onwards.

The Reserve Bank Of India introduced the MCLR on 17 December, and the guidelines mandated that banks must price incremental loans using MCLR.

Under MCLR, banks will need to consider their marginal cost of funds, or the cost incurred on incremental deposits across different maturities. To this, banks will add their operating costs, the negative carry over of their cash reserve ratio (CRR) balances with the central bank and a tenure premium.

Banks will need to publish MCLRs for at least five tenures of loans which include overnight, three months, six months and one year. The final loan rate for a borrower will be arrived at by adding the credit risk premium to the MCLR.

The MCLR is expected to improve transmission of policy rate cuts to bank loan rates.

Source : http://goo.gl/yHkRjs