Tagged: Tax Benefits

ATM :: When home loan tax deductions can get revoked

There are lock-in periods that need to be observed in case you have claimed deduction against repayment of home loan
Ashwini Kumar Sharma | Last Published: Mon, Jan 08 2018. 08 20 AM IST | LiveMint.com

ATM

There are various income tax sections under which you can claim deductions for expenses and investment incurred by you during the relevant financial years. Such deductions help you to bring down the taxable income for the respective fiscal and consequently reduce your tax liability.

However, in many cases, a lock-in period is specified—under the section of the Act as well as the instrument against which you may have claimed a deduction. If you fail to observe the lock-in period, the deductions that you availed can be revoked.

Let’s read more about the lock-in periods that need to be observed in case you have claimed deduction against repayment of home loan principal amount.

The deduction on home loan

If you take home loan for purchase or construction of a house, the capital repayment and interest paid on the home loan qualify for deduction under separate income tax sections. While principal repayment qualifies for deduction under section 80C of the Income-tax Act, 1961 and has an overall limit of Rs1.5 lakh a year, the interest payment on home loan qualifies for deduction under section 24(b) of the Act, with an overall limit of Rs2 lakh a year. There is an additional deduction of Rs50,000 for interest payment on home loans under section 80EE for the first-time homebuyers.

Lock-in period

While there is no lock-in period for deduction claimed against interest payment on home loan under section 24(b) or 80EE, the section 80C(5) (relating to repayment of principal) of the Act stipulates that if you sell your house within 5 years from purchase or date of possession, the deduction claimed on principal repayment during previous years gets revoked. In this case, all the deductions claimed for home loan principal repayment under section 80C during the previous years too have to be clubbed together and added to income of the year of sale, and be taxed accordingly.

Let us assume you had bought a house in May 2014 with a home loan, and had claimed about Rs4 lakh under section 80C over the last 3 financial years—FY2014-15 to FY2016-17. If you sell the house now, the entire Rs4 lakh claimed earlier as deduction under section 80C will get added to your income for FY2017-18 and you will have to pay tax on the total income as per the income tax slab applicable to you.

Apart from home loan principal amount, the stamp duty and registration fee paid for registration of property also qualify for deduction under section 80C in the year of purchase. If you had claimed stamp duty and registration fee as deduction, you need to observe the 5-year lock-in in these cases too.

If the property is sold before 5 years, the deductions claimed against stamp duty and registration fee will get revoked and get added to the income of the year of sale and tax accordingly.

So, before you decide to sell your house, keep the lock-in criteria in mind. Else, your tax liability may increase considerably in the year of sale.

Source: https://goo.gl/9fHJsS

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ATM :: Things to know before investing in ELSS

India Infoline News Service | Mumbai | December 30, 2017 18:41 IST
Learn about ELSS investment & answer to all your questions like what is ELSS, how to invest in ELSS, tax benefits in ELSS at Indiainfoline

ATM

Equity Linked Savings Scheme or ELSS funds are a type of mutual funds whichbase their returns from the equity market. These funds are tax saving in nature and are eligible for a tax deduction of up to Rs1.50 lakhunder Section 80C of the Income Tax Act. Below are a few things that an investor must know before investing in ELSS funds.

What is ELSS?

ELSS schemes are a category of mutual funds promoted by the government in order to encourage long term equity investments. Under this scheme, most of the fund corpus is invested in equities or equity-related products.

Types of ELSS:

There are two categories in ELSS mutual funds i.e. dividend and growth.

The dividend fund is further divided into Dividend Payout and Dividend Reinvestment. If an investor opts fordividend payout option, he receives the dividend which is also tax-free,however,underthe dividend reinvestment option, the dividend is reinvested as a fresh investment to purchase more shares.

Under the growth option, an investor can look for longterm wealth creation. It works like a cumulative option whose full value is realized on redemption of the fund.

How to invest in ELSS?

One can invest in ELSS via two methods i.e. lumpsum or SIP.

SIP or Systematic Investment Plan, is a process where an investor needs to invest a fixed amount of money every month at a specified date. SIP inculcates a disciplined approach towards investing in an investor. SIP also gives the benefit of rupee cost averaging to an investor.

What is the lock-in period in ELSS?

ELSS funds have a lock-in period of three years. Whencompared to EPF, PPF, NSC and other prevalentinvestments under Section 80C, ELSS has the shortest lock-in period.

What is the benefit of tax in ELSS?

The primary purpose of any investment is to gain deductions under income tax for wealth creation. ELSS funds fit that bill perfectly. An investor gets a doubleedged benefit of tax saving and wealth creation at the same time. Dividends earned from ELSS funds are also exempted from tax. ELSS funds also provide the benefit of long term capital gains as they have a lock-in period of three years.

What is the investment limit of ELSS funds?

One can start investing in ELSS mutual funds with a minimum amount of Rs500, and there is no upper limit on how much a person can invest in ELSS funds. However, the tax saving ceiling is only up to a maximum of Rs1,50,000 a year.

What are the risks involved in ELSS funds?

ELSS mutual funds do not have ironclad guarantee over returns, as theygenerate their earnings from investments in the equity market. Nevertheless, some of the best­ performing ELSS mutual funds have given consistent and inflationbeating returns in the longrun. This quality is not possessed by the other fixed income tax­ saving investments like PPF andFD.

Conclusion

ELSS mutual fund investment has now become a popular tax saving investment under Section 80C, and it is also ideal for retirement planning and wealth creation coupled with the benefits of lower lock-in period, SIP method of investment, rupee cost averaging risk and no tax on dividends or the benefit of capital gains. ELSS funds should be taken into account by every investor while planning their investment goals.

Disclaimer: The contents herein is specifically prepared by ‘Dalal Street Investment Journal’, and is for your information & personal consumption only. India Infoline Limited or Dalal Street Investment Journal do not guarantee the accuracy, correctness, completeness or reliability of information contained herein and shall not be held responsible.

Source: https://goo.gl/wGHgDF

ATM :: Planning your Taxes and your Loans

To avoid last-minute hassles, it is always good to plan taxes and loans in advance.
Sep 15, 2017 06:29 PM IST | MoneyControl.com

ATM

In order to avoid any last minute hassles while filing your tax returns, you need to ensure that you plan your taxes in advance. If you have the right foresight and plan your loans and taxes properly, then you can surely save a lot of money.

Here are some key details on planning your taxes and loans…

Salary restructuring

There are a few components which can help in bringing down your tax liability. For this, you need to reallocate your salary. Like medical expenses which are reimbursed by the employer, certain food coupons, house rent allowance, leave and travel allowance etc., should be used efficiently to bring down your tax liability.

Proper use of tax exemption

There are several tax saving options under 80C and 80D. Under 80C, you have options like NSC, PPF, a premium of life insurance, 5-year FD with banks and post office etc. 80D includes premium paid in Mediclaim policies.

Your tax plan and financial plan must go hand in hand

Your tax-saving plan has to be in tandem with your financial plan. Opt for tax-saving options which will contribute to achieving your financial goal.

The loan factor

There are loans which can actually help in reducing your tax burden. So, you should ensure that you make use of this benefit to the maximum.

Exploiting the loan factor:

If you are planning to take a home loan for buying a home, then restructure it in the best possible way as it can give you tax benefits. Under Section 80C, the principal repayment of housing loan can give you a deduction of up to Rs 1,50,000 and under Section 24B, the interest paid on a housing loan can get you a deduction of up to Rs 2,00,000.

Now, if the home loan amount is huge, then it may cross the tax exemption limit. In such cases, you can opt for a joint loan with spouse or parents or siblings. This will help both the individuals to get the tax benefit. It, thus, becomes a useful tax-saving option for the entire family. It should be noted that stamp duty and registration charges that are paid while transferring the property are also eligible for income tax deduction under the Section 80C.

If you take a loan to buy a second home, then to you can get the advantage of tax deductions under Sections 80C and 24B. Under Section 80C, the principal loan amount will be considered and under Section 24B, the interest paid towards the loan will be considered.

Education loan can also be taken for self or for your spouse or children. You can get tax benefits if you take the loan from a scheduled bank or a notified financial company. You can easily claim a deduction for payment of interest. The tax benefits can be enjoyed for a maximum period of eight years or on the term of the loan repayment.

Personal loans also come with the tax advantage. Personal loans which are taken for renovating or repairing home are helpful. Personal loans taken to make down payment of home loan will also give you the advantage of tax benefit.

To sum up…

Thus, there are different ways and means of reducing your tax liability. Loans give you the dual advantage. They take care of your financial needs i.e., buying a home or higher education of your children and at the same time, they also give you the much needed tax-benefit. So, explore all the pros and cons of the various loans and use them to plan your taxes effectively.

Source: https://goo.gl/FAj4J9

ATM :: A quick guide to hastening your home loan repayment

By RoofandFloor | UPDATED: JULY 17, 2017 14:00 IST | The Hindu

ATM

The thought of owing someone a debt is an uncomfortable one for most of us. When the amount owed is large, as in the case of home loans, the cognitive discomfort can be significantly greater. Additionally, the monthly financial burden of paying EMIs and housing loan interest isn’t exactly everyone’s cup of tea. To counter this, many homeowners choose to prepay their home loans.

There are multiple schools of thought when it comes to prepaying a home loan. However, there is no one-size-fits-all approach, and the decision must be made considering both financial and personal aspects.

Merely making the decision to prepay your property loan doesn’t solve your problem, though. Figuring out how to save up for prepayment is the key to succeeding without financial discomfort.

If prepaying your home loan is an option you’d like to consider, here’s a short guide on how you can make that happen.

Consider the decision

Determine whether prepayment is right for you. Home loans offer tax benefits that need to be taken into account. For instance, the housing loan interest (upper limit of Rs 2 lakh) can be deducted from taxable income. However, if your interest amount exceeds the upper limit, prepayment could save you the additional cost. Every individual’s situation is unique and should be assessed carefully before making the choice.

Fortify your backup

Get your financial safety net in place before committing to prepay the home loan. A general rule of thumb is to have the following taken care of:

• Emergency funds (medical or otherwise)

• Backup savings for EMIs and regular expenses in case of loss of employment

• Children’s education funds

• Other recurring financial liabilities

Plug the leaks

Scrutinise your financial records to identify where you tend to haemorrhage money. They usually show up in the form of unnecessary frills such as credit cards with additional privileges (that you don’t use), unused memberships (clubs, gyms and recreational establishments), loans with high-interest rates (here refinancing is an option) and so on. Eliminating these situations will improve your disposable income and thereby your savings.

Get creative

Saving up to prepay home loans can be simplified with some thought. Consider replacing your expensive forms of entertainment and recreation with creative, cost effective solutions. Tighten the purse strings as far as possible to boost your monthly savings.

Hike up the EMIs

This is a simple yet effective option. Even marginal increases in EMI payments can help reduce the principal amount. This helps reduce the tenure of the home loan. Reduced home loan tenure then results in lower total home loan interests.

Utilize windfalls

Consider partial repayments from unexpected sources of income such as bonuses, gifts from family and so on. Check with your bank regarding the number of partial repayments allowed beforehand (usually there is no such limit).

Supercharge your savings

Consider investing in a reputed mutual fund with reasonably good returns meant purely for home loan prepayment. Returns are higher than normal savings accounts while the tax payable is far lower than other forms of savings such as fixed deposits.

The choice to prepay a property loan should be made rationally and be backed by careful planning. Hasty, emotion-driven decisions could seriously hamper your overall financial wellbeing.

This article is contributed by RoofandFloor, part of KSL Digital Ventures Pvt. Ltd., from The Hindu Group

Source: https://goo.gl/gYFXTh

ATM :: Home loan tax reliefs often missed by taxpayers

By Preeti Motiani | ECONOMICTIMES.COM | May 11, 2017, 10.55 AM IST

ATM

The Union budget of 2017 brought mixed bundle of joy for the taxpayers. While the section 80EE was re-introduced, holding period was lowered which brought cheers for the taxpayers, on the other hand, the individuals claiming a loss on the let out property or deemed to be let out property were left in shock.

Many of you who already own a second house or looking to buy a new house might give a look at the rules listed below to receive the often missed benefits.

1. You can claim tax benefit on interest paid even if you missed an EMI.
Section 24 of the I-T act mentions the word interest payment “payable” on housing loan. It means that even if you have missed the EMI payment in a year you can still claim the tax benefit on it. It can be claimed as a deduction so long as the interest liability is there.

Kuldip Kumar, Partner and Leader – Personal Tax, PWC says, “One should retain the copy of the interest certificate issued by the lender i.e. bank or NBFC specifying the amount of loan, interest due etc. as this will help in case of any questioning from the tax department.”

The principal repayment deduction under Section 80C, however, is available only on actual repayments.

2. Principal repayment tax benefit is reversed if you sell before 5 years.
While the finance minister may have provided a relief by reducing the holding period to 24 months to qualify for the long-term capital gains but if you sell a house within five years from the date of purchase, or, five years from the date of taking the home loan, the tax benefit gets reversed.

“The deduction claimed will be added back to the income of the taxpayer in the year in which the property is sold,” says Archit Gupta, founder, Cleartax.com

However, the loan amortisation calculations are such that the repayment schedule has lower component of principal repayment in the initial years of the home loan and the tax reversal rule only applies to Section 80C. Also, the benefit of lowered holding period for capital gains will apply from April 1, 2018, AY only.

3. You are eligible for tax break only when you are a co-borrower and co-owner.
You cannot claim a tax break on a home loan even if you may be the one who is paying the EMI. For instance, there may be a situation when you’re paying the EMI of a home loan for the property which is owned by your parents or spouse.

“However, when the house is in the joint name and funded by both the spouses by a way of housing loan, both husband and wife can avail the separate deduction for the interest payments and principal repayment of such loan,” says Kumar.

Even if you own a property with your spouse, you can’t claim deductions if your name’s not on the loan book as a co-borrower.

4. You can claim pre-construction period interest for up to 5 years.
Any interest paid on the borrowing during the construction of a house is eligible for tax relief only after you have received the completion certificate.

“Interest paid during the construction period can be claimed as a tax deduction in five equal instalments starting from the year in which construction of the property is completed. The total tax benefit will be annual interest payable + 1/5th of the pre-construction period “says Gupta.

While filing returns for the AY 2017-18, the maximum limit for the self-occupied property is Rs 2 lakh. In the case of let out property, there is no limit.

The union budget 2017 has removed this anomaly and put the cap of Rs 2 lakh on the let out property. The same will be effective while filing the returns for next year i.e. 2018-19.

5. Re-introduction of the Section 80EE
To provide an additional relief to the homebuyers, the section 80EE has been reintroduced with effect from April 1, 2017. The maximum deduction available has been reduced from earlier of Rs 1 lakh to Rs 50,000 now.

However, this deduction comes with certain restrictions which need to be satisfied while availing this deduction. The conditions are:
a) The home-owner/s should be first time buyer even if the property is bought in the joint ownership,
b) The loan value must not exceed Rs 35 lakh and property value should not exceed Rs 50 lakh, and
c) The loan must be sanctioned by a financial institution during the period April 1st, 2016 to March 31st, 2017.

Archit Gupta, Founder & CEO, Cleartax.com says, “If the taxpayers are able to meet conditions for both of section 24 and 80EE, their taxable income can be reduced by 2.5 lakhs in FY 2016-17 return filing.”

6. Processing fee and other charges are tax deductible.
Most taxpayers are unaware that charges related to their loans such as processing fees or prepayment charges qualify for tax deduction. As per law, these charges are considered as interest and therefore deduction on the same can be claimed.

“Section 2(28A) of I-T Act defines interest as interest payable which includes any service fees and other charges in any manner in respect of money borrowed,” says Kumar.

Therefore, it is eligible for deduction under Section 24 against income from house property. Other charges also come under this category but penal charges do not.

Also, any payment made towards stamp duty and registration fees incurred by the individual are also tax deductible as per the section 80C(2) (xviii) (d) of the act.

7. Loans from relatives, friends and employer are eligible for tax deduction.
If you have taken a loan from friends and/or relatives to acquire a house then you can claim a deduction under Section 24 for interest repayment on loans. You can also claim a deduction for money borrowed from individuals for reconstruction and repairs of property.

“A taxpayer would need to obtain a certificate from the relative which would contain the details such as the amount of interest payable, amount of loan taken, specifying the property details for which loan is taken,” says Kumar.

However, one must remember that this rule is only applicable for interest repayment. You cannot avail the tax benefits available on the principal repayment on that part of the loan borrowed from your relatives, friends and employer.

Further, a lender, in this case, your relatives and friends must disclose the interest earned on such transaction while filing their income tax returns.

Source: https://goo.gl/3hozR4

NTH :: New Income Tax Rules On Home Loan Come Into Effect. Details Here

Now the limit that can set off against the loss from rented house property has been restricted to Rs. 2 lakh per annum.
Edited by Surajit Dasgupta | Last Updated: April 09, 2017 16:48 (IST) | NDTV Profit

NTH

The government has changed income tax rules that could increase the tax outgo of those who have taken a home loan for a property that has been rented out. The amount that could be set off on home loans for rented property has been reduced. Earlier, in case of rented property, the loss from house property – which is basically the interest paid on home loan minus rental income – was allowed to be adjusted from income without any limit. This helped significantly reduce tax liability. Now the limit that can set off against the loss from rented house property has been restricted to Rs. 2 lakh per annum. This came into effect from April 1, 2017 (assessment year 2018-19).

However, on rented properties, the interest paid above Rs. 2 lakh can be carried forward for eight assessment years. Since the interest component of home loan repaid in initial years is higher, experts say that the borrower may not be able to fully adjust the interest paid as deduction even in subsequent years.

For example, your interest outgo on a second property is Rs. 5 lakh in a particular year. Assume that you are earning a rent of Rs. 1.5 lakh annually from the property. Such buyers, as per the current rules, are allowed to adjust the difference of Rs. 3.5 lakh (Rs. 5 lakh interest minus Rs. 1.5 lakh). But from the next financial year, they will be allowed deduction of just Rs. 2 lakh. The remaining amount of Rs. 1.5 lakh (Rs. 3.5 lakh minus Rs. 2 lakh) can be carried forward up to eight financial years and be adjusted later.

Tax experts say that some high net worth individuals – who used to buy properties on loan and were able to set off the full interest liability against the lettable value of property and thus bring down their tax liability substantially – would be particularly hit from this new tax rule.

Note: Income tax rules say that those who own more than one property can only treat one of them as self-occupied and the rest have to be assumed to be rented. Income tax has to be paid on notional rent.

From April another tax rule related to the properties will also change. The new tax rule will help bring down tax liability from property sale. The holding period of a property for qualifying under long-term gains will get reduced to two years, from three years currently. As per current tax norms, if a property is sold within three years of buying, the profit from the transaction is treated as short-term capital gain and is taxed according to the slab rate applicable to him/her. So reducing this time period to two years will bring down tax liability.

Thus, after two years, the transaction will be able to qualify for long-term capital gains, thus lower taxes. Under long-term capital gains on immovable properties, the profit is taxed at 20 per after indexation. Under indexation, inflation during the holding period is taken into account and thus the purchase price is adjusted, reducing the tax burden on the property seller. There are also other benefits for the seller under the long-term capital gains tax. If the gains are invested in some select government investment schemes, the tax liability goes down significantly.

Source: https://goo.gl/N8K3mp

NTH :: Income Tax Rules On Home Loan To Change From Saturday. Details Here

Tax experts say that some high net worth individuals, who used to buy properties on loan and were able to set off the full interest liability against the lettable value of property and thus bring down their tax liability substantially, would be particularly hit from this new tax rule.
Written by Surajit Dasgupta | Last Updated: March 28, 2017 09:01 (IST) | NDTV Profit

NTH

Interest paid above Rs. 2 lakh on rented properties can be carried forward for 8 years from April 1.

To address the anomaly of interest deduction in respect of let-out property vs self-occupied property, the government has changed income tax rules, which will come into effect from next financial year April 1, 2017 (assessment year 2018-19). In this regard, the government has cut down tax benefits borrowers enjoyed on properties let out on rent. According to current tax laws, for properties rented out, a borrower could deduct the entire interest paid on home loan after adjusting for the rental income. On the other hand, borrowers of self-occupied properties get Rs. 2 lakh deduction on interest repayment on home loan.

However, on rented properties, effective from April 1, interest paid above Rs. 2 lakh can be carried forward for eight assessment years. Since the interest component of home loan repaid in initial years is higher, experts say that the borrower may not be able to fully adjust the interest paid as deduction even in subsequent years.

For example, your interest outgo on a second property is Rs. 5 lakh in a particular year. Assume that you are earning a rent of Rs. 1.5 lakh annually from the property. Such buyers, according to the current rule, are allowed to adjust the difference of Rs. 3.5 lakh (Rs. 5 lakh interest minus Rs. 1.5 lakh). But from the next financial year, they will be allowed deduction of just Rs. 2 lakh. The remaining amount of Rs. 1.5 lakh (Rs. 3.5 lakh minus Rs. 2 lakh) can be carried forward up to eight financial years and be adjusted later.

Tax experts say that some high net worth individuals, who used to buy properties on loan and were able to set off the full interest liability against the lettable value of property and thus bring down their tax liability substantially, would be particularly hit from this new tax rule.

From April another tax rule related to the properties will also change. The new tax rule will help bring down tax liability from property sale. The holding period of a property for qualifying under long-term gains will get reduced to two years, from three years currently. As per current tax norms, if a property is sold within three years of buying, the profit from the transaction is treated as short-term capital gain and is taxed according to the slab rate applicable to him/her. So reducing this time period to two years will bring down tax liability.

Thus, after two years, the transaction will be able to qualify for long-term capital gains, thus lower taxes. Under long-term capital gains on immovable properties, the profit is taxed at 20 per after indexation. Under indexation, inflation during the holding period is taken into account and thus the purchase price is adjusted, reducing the tax burden on the property seller. There are also other benefits for the seller under the long-term capital gains tax. If the gains are invested in some select government investment schemes, the tax liability goes down significantly.

(Know Your Tax Liability Here)

Source: https://goo.gl/jwT9V2